A prestigious world research institute situated in France last week released a study that highly recommended the use of Ivermectin, an antiparasitic, in treating the illnesses caused by the CCP Virus (or COVID-19).

In a study released on July 12 in EMBO Molecular Medicine, scientists from the French Pasteur Institute suggested that Ivermectin, the antiparasitic most popularly used against parasites such as scabies, lice, and other skin condition such as rosacea, can “improve the clinical condition of SARS-CoV-2-infected patients.”

According to the research led by Guilherme Dias de Melo, as the researchers gave SARS-CoV-2 (CCP Virus or COVID-19) infected hamsters the Ivermectin drug, they figured that it can impede “the inflammation of the respiratory tract and the symptoms which result from it” and offer “protection against loss of smell.”

“Here, we show that standard doses of Ivermectin (IVM), an anti-parasitic drug with potential immunomodulatory activities through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, prevent clinical deterioration, reduce olfactory deficit, and limit the inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts in SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters,” wrote the report. 

Their research revealed that this particular drug has different abilities by gender, given that it works best in female recipients. Nonetheless, despite showing high efficiency in mitigating inflammation and ensuing symptoms of the SARS-CoV-2, Ivermectin did not reduce the amount of virus in an infected person’s blood.

 “This study supports the use of immunomodulatory drugs such as Ivermectin, to improve the clinical condition of SARS-CoV-infected patients,” the researchers from the French non-profit private foundation concluded. 

Scientists at the French Pasteur Institute were not the first to recommend Ivermectin as a promising therapy against the CCP Virus. Trial Site News said that more than 62 Ivermectin studies (randomized controlled trials, observational and case series) conducted around the world produced similar positive outcomes. 

But much like the other treatments such as hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine, which has gained compelling results in real-world scenarios, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have firmly dismissed the use of Ivermectin in CCP Virus infected patients. 

“The current evidence on the use of Ivermectin to treat COVID-19 patients is inconclusive. Until more data is available, WHO recommends that the drug only be used within clinical trials,” WHO declared on its website. 

The FDA gives out the same explanation, too, saying it “has not reviewed data to support the use of ivermectin in COVID-19 patients to treat or to prevent COVID-19,” but noted, “research is underway.” 

The trial Site argued that allowing more attention to such drugs, which usually come with affordable prices, will further enable low and middle-income countries more opportunities to withstand the CCP Virus pandemic. 

In terms of the obstinate rejection of Ivermectin by WHO, the outlet reported that many Bombay lawyers had announced a lawsuit against the organization and its chief scientist, Soumya Swaminathan, for ignoring the growing scientific documents that favor the drug.