People living near the sea were evacuated, airline flights and trains were canceled, and the public was told to stay indoors as Typhoon In-fa struck China’s east coast south of Shanghai on Sunday, July 25. The storm arrived while central China was already reeling from record floods that killed at least 58 people, knocked out power, and forced more than 1 million people to flee their homes.

The Meteorological Administration claimed wind speeds in Typhoon In-fa reached 38 meters per second. According to Reuters calculations, this equates to around 137 km/h (85 mph). The typhoon was traveling at a speed of 15 kph (9 mph).

While a new storm approaches the country’s east coast, severe flooding in central China has spurred a social media outcry for official accountability.

“Have you seen him?” a woman posted a photo of her husband, Sha Tao, on the Chinese microblogging site Weibo

Many victims of the tragic flood in China’s central Henan Province demanded to know why the subway was not shut down as the floods surged on the streets above them.

According to a statement posted on Weibo on Thursday, the disaster was blamed on a “rare heavy rainstorm” that forced water to break through a retaining wall at Shakou Road Station at 6 p.m. local time, trapping over 500 passengers.

“Why didn’t you close the station immediately when water began to seep in between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m.,” Queyibuke, a social media user, questioned.

“A dozen passengers have died and no one is taking responsibility,” wrote another.

“Most floods in China, including the flooding in 2020, are caused by extreme precipitation,” the Lancet science journal issued a report in October.

“We find that the accumulated negative environmental effects of constructed dams have increased significantly,” the journal Science of The Total Environment wrote last month. This has “led to large-scale hydrophysical and human health risk affecting the Yangtze River Basins downstream and reservoir areas.”

However, such issues haven’t deterred dam building.