Former President Donald Trump has expressed his dissatisfaction with two justices that he nominated to the Supreme Court after they vote to save the controversial Affordable Care Act which he sought to strike down during his presidency.

During an interview with Just the News on Monday, June 21, Trump said that he is “very disappointed” with a number of rulings from Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett.

“I fought very hard for them, but I was very disappointed with a number of their rulings,” Trump told Real America’s Voice show host David Brody.

His remarks came several days after Kavanaugh and Coney Barrett joined other justices to vote 7-2 on June 17 to reject a joint lawsuit brought by 17 Republican states to overturn the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Trump nominated Kavanaugh and Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court during his presidency and fought for Kavanaugh in a partisan confirmation battle.

In Monday’s exclusive interview, Trump said that he did not indulge second thoughts about having nominated the conservative justices to the court.  

“Second guessing does no good, but I was disappointed with a number of rulings that they made,” he said.

During his time in the White House, Trump appointed three justices to the high court. In the vote last week, his third appointee, Neil Gorsuch, voted in dissent. Another justice who spoke in favor of the plaintiff states was Samuel Alito.

The 17 GOP states had sought to kill Obamacare entirely, arguing that the entire legislation is unconstitutional. The case focused on the law’s individual mandate in light of the 2017 elimination of the plan’s individual penalties for not purchasing insurance.

The elimination of the penalties had become the hook that the Republican states and the Trump administration used to attack the law, arguing that without the mandate, a pillar of the law when it was passed, the rest of the law should fall.

In fact, following the imposition of the law during the Obama administration in March 2010, the rising costs and declining choices in health coverage have not stopped. Prices doubled in the first four years of the program, and millions of people lost the coverage they previously had.

The price increases for accessing health care services are primarily because Obamacare regulations, fees, and other provisions of the law severely affected private providers who saw a considerable increase in their costs overnight, which were translated into the rates ultimately paid by consumers.

During his presidency, Trump signed several executive orders in September 2020 that would have become part of a revamped health care plan promised years earlier. The plan included options such as prescription drug cost reductions and an end to so-called surprise billing.

Eventually, plans for a more efficient health care plan were dashed when Democrats took control of the White House.