Opinion

In a story published by The New York Times on Feb. 23, Mara Wilson, the actress who played “Matilda” as a child, recounts how during her time in Hollywood as a young child, she was asked sexual questions by the media when she was just 6 years old.

Despite having acted in family films and having the care of her parents, Wilson still remembers how perverse the Hollywood environment, which with the help of the media and the encouragement of certain audiences, seriously disturbed her childhood.

“I mostly acted in family—the remake of ‘Miracle on 34th Street,’ ‘Matilda,’ ‘Mrs. Doubtfire.’ I never appeared in anything more revealing than a knee-length sundress. This was all intentional: My parents thought I would be safer that way. But it didn’t work,” the actress wrote.

She added, “People had been asking me, ‘Do you have a boyfriend?’ in interviews since I was 6. Reporters asked me who I thought the sexiest actor was and about Hugh Grant’s arrest for soliciting a prostitute. It was cute when 10-year-olds sent me letters saying they were in love with me. It was not when 50-year-old men did. Before I even turned 12, there were images of me on foot fetish websites and photoshopped into child pornography.”

In her opinion piece, Wilson compares her story to that of Britney Spears, the famous singer who at one point in her life began acting irrationally, but both ended their careers in a very different way, because of one key factor: family.

“Many moments of Ms. Spears’s life were familiar to me. We both had dolls made of us, had close friends and boyfriends sharing our secrets and had grown men commenting on our bodies. But my life was easier not only because I was never tabloid-level famous but also because unlike Ms. Spears, I always had my family’s support,” Wilson explained.

The actress remarked that sexual harassment did not come from within Hollywood, but from the media and the public.

“Hollywood has resolved to tackle harassment in the industry, but I was never sexually harassed on a film set. My sexual harassment always came at the hands of the media and the public.”

However, there are many stories past and present that tell us that Hollywood, from the inside, is plagued by sexual harassment and even worse, beyond the “decision” to address the issue.

The Corey Feldman Story

Actor Corey Feldman, of “Stand by Me” and “The Goonies” two hits of the 1980s, as an adult said that the “the biggest problem in Hollywood is pedophilia.”

In a memoir he recounted that both he and his late actor friend, Corey Haim, were raped in the film industry when they were underage, which then led to addictions.

Going through the Hollywood ordeal: become depraved or leave the industry

Many actresses and actors who started acting at a very young age and achieved fame, had to pass Hollywood’s litmus test: after passing adolescence, either you become sexually depraved or you are out of business.

Cases like Miley Cyrus who as a child played the innocent Hannah Montana, and today is famous for her completely sexualized music videos to use a light term.

Kathy Perry, who had been singing normal songs for years without attracting anyone’s attention, shot to fame after writing a song that says “I kissed a girl and I liked it.”

Conversely, as in Wilson’s case, by refusing to submit to the sexualization of Hollywood, she ended up outside the perverted world of movies and music, thanks to the support of her family.